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Luminance-dependent visual processing enables moth flight in low light.

Overview of attention for article published in Science, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
26 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
34 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
104 Mendeley
Title
Luminance-dependent visual processing enables moth flight in low light.
Published in
Science, June 2015
DOI 10.1126/science.aaa3042
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simon Sponberg, Jonathan P. Dyhr, Robert W. Hall, Thomas L. Daniel

Abstract

Animals must operate under an enormous range of light intensities. Nocturnal and twilight flying insects are hypothesized to compensate for dim conditions by integrating light over longer times. This slowing of visual processing would increase light sensitivity but should also reduce movement response times. Using freely hovering moths tracking robotic moving flowers, we showed that the moth's visual processing does slow in dim light. These longer response times are consistent with models of how visual neurons enhance sensitivity at low light intensities, but they could pose a challenge for moths feeding from swaying flowers. Dusk-foraging moths avoid this sensorimotor tradeoff; their nervous systems slow down but not so much as to interfere with their ability to track the movements of real wind-blown flowers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 5%
Germany 4 4%
Sweden 2 2%
France 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 88 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 35%
Researcher 28 27%
Student > Master 10 10%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 7%
Other 16 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 51%
Engineering 19 18%
Neuroscience 13 13%
Physics and Astronomy 5 5%
Unspecified 3 3%
Other 11 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 279. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2017.
All research outputs
#22,751
of 8,359,272 outputs
Outputs from Science
#903
of 41,678 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#783
of 223,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#43
of 794 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,359,272 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 41,678 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,915 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 794 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.